Anti-racism

Condemn Niagara Region’s Anti-BDS Resolution

The Communist Party of Canada (Ontario) condemns the Niagara Region Municipality's resolution condemning Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) against Israel as racist. The BDS campaign is targeted at those who are complicit with Israel's human rights abuses, not the Jewish people or even Israel as a state. It is quite rich that the Niagara Region government pretends to be sensitive to anti-Semitism when two Regional Council members were caught on camera making Nazi-salutes in the middle of an official meeting of the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) in January, 2017. The response by the chair of the NPCA, who moved the motion in Niagara Regional Council to condemn BDS as racist, was to delete the salutes from the public record. (more…)

By admin, ago
Health

Real action on the opioid crisis in Ontario

Since becoming widely used to manage chronic pain more than two decades ago, opioid drugs have become amongst the most widely-prescribed class of medications in Canada. Canadians are the second highest per capita consumers of prescription opioid medications in the world, with an average of 53 prescriptions written for every 100 people each year. Unfortunately, the widespread availability of prescription opioid medications and their highly addictive nature have resulted in a dramatic rise in the rate of opioid dependency and has fuelled a growing crisis that has affected every province in Canada. Overdoses involving fentanyl—a synthetic opioid that is 50 to 100× more potent than morphine—have resulted in at least 655 deaths in Canada between 2009-2014. In Ontario, there was a staggering 867 opioid-related deaths in 2016 alone. While there is much discussion and debate amongst regulatory bodies, healthcare experts and the public on how to curb the opioid crisis, relative little has been said about the damning role of the profit-driven pharmaceutical industry that had sparked the crisis. In 1995, Purdue Pharma—an American pharmaceutical company—produced and began to market OxyContin, a semisynthetic opioid produced from the Persian poppy plant, to physicians as a safe and effective means of controlling chronic, non-cancer pain. Purdue, by its own admission, deliberately misled physicians about the risks of prescribing this drug—claiming that it had little addictive potential. As a result, OxyContin became the first opioid drug to be widely used to manage pain and opened the way for the massive over-prescription of these medications and the resultant surge in opioid addiction. (more…)

By admin, ago
Anti-racism

Support Haudenosaunee Treaty Right to Hunt

The Communist Party of Canada (Ontario) supports the Haudenosaunee right to hunt at Short Hills Provincial Park, organized by the Haudenosaunee Wildlife and Habitat Authority and authorized by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council. The hunts are protected under treaty rights dating back to the founding of European settlement in Niagara and must be respected by all. We condemn the racist obstruction of treaty rights by those claiming to be protecting animal rights. These actions are in fact perpetuating violations of Indigenous treaty rights which amount to cultural genocide, and are a continuation of the genocidal policies of the Canadian government, as recognized even by the United Nations Rapporteur for Indigenous Peoples. This is evident by the racist abuse and intimidation Indigenous hunters have been subjected to by those who have been barricading the hunt. We condemn the Ontario Provincial Police and Niagara Regional Police Service's complicity with those obstructing the hunt, who must not be allowed to interfere in treaty obligations. We also call upon the Minister for Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs to protect the exercise of treaty rights at Short Hills Provincial Park. (more…)

By admin, ago
Austerity

Solidarity with striking college faculty in Ontario #standwithfaculty

The Communist Party of Canada (Ontario) extends its full support to the 12,000 college faculty, members of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU), who are on strike at Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology (CAATs) across the province. The strike began on October 16, after the College Employer Council (CEC) rejected a streamlined final offer from the union and walked away from the table. The offer, described by the union as “bare minimum we need to ensure quality education for students and treat contract faculty fairly,” included non-monetary proposals such as stronger recognition of academic freedom, improved seniority provisions, and longer notice periods for teaching contracts and work assignments. The key demand in the union’s offer is for a 50:50 ratio of full-time to non-full-time faculty. This is a response to the colleges’ increasing reliance on part-time and contract teaching positions. Between 2004 and 2016 part-time college faculty increased by a huge 45%, while full-time faculty only increased by 15%. Currently, part-time and precariously employed faculty now outnumber full-time faculty by almost three times. (more…)

By admin, ago